Elderly warned of phone scammers, report anything suspicious

Written by admin on 28/09/2019 Categories: 广州桑拿

A WARRNAMBOOL man has warned residents to be on guard for scams after he was recently targeted.
Nanjing Night Net

Kevin McCarthy, 74, said he got a phone call from someone claiming to be from the Department of Human Services who said he had been underpaid his pension.

WARNING: Kevin McCarthy is warning others about a phone scam telling people they’ve been underpaid their pension.

He said he was told to contact a Canberra phone number which he did and he was told he was owed $2800 from Centrelink.

Mr McCarthy then phoned Centrelink who told him it was a scam.

“They (the scammers) rang back and I told them to nick off,” he said.

Kevin McCarthyThe Standard. “We see people losing large amounts of money and pensioners don’t have a lot to lose.”

She said often the person was told they were owed money and they needed to provide a payment via an iTunes card to access the money.

“No one (legitimate)will ever ask someone to pay money in order to get money,” she said. “Centrelink will never ask for your bank details over the phone.”

Ms Rickard said people should be very weary when they were contacted out of the blue by a government department.“Don’t give anyone your personal information,” she said. “Don’t give out your bank details to anyone.”

So far this year there have been $64 million lost in scams and 120,000 reports of scams in Australia.

For more information check out Scamwatch.

The Standard, Warrnambool

Comments Off on Elderly warned of phone scammers, report anything suspicious

CEOs to discuss free agency compo formula

Written by admin on  Categories: 广州桑拿

The controversial secret formula used to determine compensation picks if a club loses a free agent will be discussed when AFL CEOs meet in November ahead of the 2017 national draft.
Nanjing Night Net

Clubs were shocked during the trade period when Geelong received the same compensation for losing Steven Motlop to Port Adelaide as the Brisbane Lions received for losing their former skipper Tom Rockliff.

Both clubs received a selection after the first round, with the Lions handed pick 18 for losing their two-time best and fairest Rockliff, 27, and the Cats given pick 19 for losing Motlop, 26, who was runner-up in the Cats best and fairest in 2015.

Both players signed four-year deals to continue their careers with Port.

The Lions took their concerns to the AFL on Wednesday with CEO Greg Swann and football manager David Noble seeking an explanation for how both clubs received an end-of-first-round compensation.

Noble has suggested that if a similar situation arose in the future then clubs which finish outside the top eight could receive compensation after selection 10 in the national draft, while clubs which finished the year inside the top eight might receive a selection after the first round.

“We don’t believe that there’s enough mechanisms or enough levels in there,” Noble told Trade Radio on Tuesday.

It is understood the Lions intend to put the issue on the agenda at the next AFL CEOs meeting.

Geelong eventually ended up using the selection 19 they received as compensation for losing Motlop in the trade with Gold Coast that enabled Gary Ablett to return to his former club.

The Cats traded out pick 19 and a future round-two selection for Ablett, pick 24 and a future round-four selection.

The compensation formula has been a closely guarded secret since the introduction of free agency with the AFLPA arguing compensation should be scrapped.

The AFL has to make a change to the free agency rules by October 31 with parties anticipating free agents will maintain their free agency status when they come out of contract even if they change clubs.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Comments Off on CEOs to discuss free agency compo formula

Bridie O’Donnell wants to make women’s sport better, so others don’t suffer like she did

Written by admin on  Categories: 广州桑拿

Former champion Australian road cyclist Bridie O’Donnell used to find herself in “compromising positions” just to be paid, such was the state of European professional women’s cycling in 2010.
Nanjing Night Net

Promised her money but then not paid on time, O’Donnell (while riding professionally in Italy) was on one occasion told to meet her “financially and emotionally abusive” team director at his house at 10pm so she could get her wage.

“I’d take a teammate with me and he’d be furious,” O’Donnell, Victoria’s head of the brand-new Office for Women in Sport and Recreation, told Fairfax Media.

“You’d hear these stories about him and I was put in a really bad position and didn’t want to not demand the salary we had agreed on and signed on in a contract, but I also knew that other athletes who had complained to the UCI about instances that were highly inappropriate were met with no help or recourse.

“He would show up at our team house – which he owns – to scream at you about the way the house is cleaned … There wasn’t at that time great governance about how teams managed riders, whether or not they paid them, honoured contracts or whether they emotionally, physically, sexually or financially abused them.”

O’Donnell also said if you spoke up against the bosses in those teams you simply weren’t selected to compete, because the team heads knew not competing would make it hard for the athletes to be chosen to ride for their countries.

“Being on these teams is the only pathway to race professionally or in UCI-governed races. You can’t be an independent person and enter like a triathlon or ironman.”

While things have improved, there is still no UCI-sanctioned minimum wage for female riders.

It was experiences like those that inspired O’Donnell – a medical doctor who has worked recently at the Epworth Hospital – to become the first head of Victoria’s Office for Women in Sport and Recreation (OWSR).

She understands how gaps in the political governance of sport can lead to poor conditions for female athletes and wants Victorian women to have the best possible recreational environments on offer – whether they’re elite performers or weekend warriors.

O’Donnell is a national road time-trial champion, represented Australia at three world championships, and once held the world track hour record.

OWSR was announced earlier in 2017 as one of the recommendations from a panel of experts, headed by Richmond president Peggy O’Neal, which looked into how Victoria’s politicians could better govern women’s sport given its recent surge in popularity.

Given the success of the AFLW, the rise of the Matildas and the continuing strength of women in sports such as basketball and netball the government wants to both “strike while the iron is hot” and get as many women playing sport as possible, while simultaneously making sure conditions and infrastructure for that to happen are adequate.

O’Donnell is passionate about using her role to make sport and recreation easier, safer, more inclusive and more tailored to women in Victoria and will work to implement changes from a professional level right down to “mums taking their kids for a walk more regularly”.

“Married women who work with children have the worst mental and physical health in Australia,” she said. “They constantly prioritise themselves last. They put children, partner, finances, job, the dog before them.

“It’s just reminding women that it’s about you’re a better mother, wife, daughter or whatever if you have had time to be active, to be healthy. You can do more.

“The bandwidth of behaviour change that I can influence and the possible policies and future that I can shape of young women and their attitudes to themselves and how they can be involved across all areas of sport, including governing, I couldn’t pass this up.”

She was a rower and an ironman triathlete before she became a cyclist at age 36. When she wasn’t able to get a cycling contract overseas she returned to Australia to ride and manage local teams, something that she said prepared her for her new role.

“I’ve had so much lived experience of good and bad challenges in sport and the same in medicine. There is a long history of ruthless, hierarchical bullying in the medical fraternity toward women.

“For many women they just change or shape their efforts to remain as focused as they can on what they can control but it does mean you hit a ceiling on what you can achieve.”

O’Donnell will have three staff working with her in the office and will begin in the role in early November and she says getting out and meeting people involved in women’s sport will be her top priority.

“I am going to need to hear a lot of people tell me what they want, what they’re doing, what’s working and what’s not working and then we almost need a massive piece of butcher’s paper and then sit down and prioritise things.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Comments Off on Bridie O’Donnell wants to make women’s sport better, so others don’t suffer like she did

Parkes keen to speed up for MotoGP

Written by admin on  Categories: 广州桑拿

OPPORTUNITY: Hunter rider Broc Parkes gets accustomed with Phillip Island again ahead of this weekend’s Australian MotoGP. The 35-year-old was slowest in Friday’s opening two practice sessions after scoring a late call up to race for Tech 3 Yamaha. Qualifying takes place on Saturday followed by the main event on Sunday. Picture: APHunter rider Broc Parkes hopes to keep improvinghis speed in Australian MotoGP qualifying sessions at Phillip Island on Saturdayafter struggling inpractice.
Nanjing Night Net

The 35-year-old, who was a late call up to race Sunday’s main event (4pm) with Tech 3 Yamaha, was the slowest of 23 competitors around the circuit in both the morning and afternoon runs.

Parkes completed 38 laps in total on Friday andeventually cut0.902 seconds off his best performance, stopping the clock at one minute, 32.152 seconds (1’32.152).

He was 2.927s off pacesetterAleix Espargaro (1’29.225) with Marc Marquez (+0.005) next best and fellow Australian Jack Miller (+0.241) sixth overall only three weeks after breaking his leg in a training accident.

But in a promising sign ahead of Saturday’s final two practice sessions and qualifying, Parkes top speed on Friday went from 313.2 kmph to 324.7 kmph.

It has been a whirlwind experience this week for the nowEndurance World Championship regular, who last rode a one-off MotoGP two years ago and steered afull rookie season in 2014.

“The call-up for this opportunity came at the last minute as I was in Andorra and I asked for it on Friday [last week],” Parkes said post-practice on Friday.

“Then, I heard from [team founder] Hervé [Poncharal] the next day and so I jumped on the plane and got here [Australia] midweek.In all honesty, it was a bit of a struggle todayas I thought I would get on with the bike quicker.

“It hasnot been easy and I had a small crash in the afternoon, which caused us to lose some time at the end.

“Yet, up until then, we started to advance and I made progress. The best guys in the world are in this class and they have been on their bikes for a long time so to jump on the Yamaha and try to be competitive straight away is definitely not an easy task. However, it’s going well and I am looking forward to tomorrow.”

Parkes replacedJonas Folger, who returned home to his native Germany with illness before last weekend’s Japanese grand prix.It is believed Folger has been diagnosed with mononucleosis, ruling him out of upcoming races in Malaysia and Valencia.

Comments Off on Parkes keen to speed up for MotoGP

Mattara Classic continues unbroken history

Written by admin on  Categories: 广州桑拿

Mattara Classic continues unbroken history PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.
Nanjing Night Net

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

PRESTIGE: The Mattara Surf Classic has been a staple of the surfing calendar since 1962 and is set for its 56th tournament.

TweetFacebookRelatedJackson Baker looks to add name to illustrious list ahead of Hawaiian campaignMerewether’s Philippa Anderson to compete in World Qualifying Series at Birubi BeachNewcastle’s Mattara Surf Classic entries open for 2017Mattara Surf Classic 2016: Jamie Skillin survives late scare to claim title

Comments Off on Mattara Classic continues unbroken history

Duncan ready to roar as Jets travel north

Written by admin on  Categories: 广州桑拿

STRONG START: Jets goalkeeper Jack Duncan dives full stretch to his left during a training drill at Ray Watt Oval. Picture: Sproule Sports FocusJACK Duncan remembers it like yesterday.
Nanjing Night Net

The then 18-year-old keeper had been called up from youth league to sit on the bench for the Jets’ clash against a red-hot Brisbane Roar at McDonald Jones Stadium in round seven of the 2011-12 season.

Duncan wassoaking up the atmosphere, enjoying the ring-side seats, when the unthinkable happened.

ICYMI | Jack Duncan’s save on Sunday was something else! 💪 pic.twitter南京夜网/ifIur5mc2J

— NEWCASTLE JETS FC ✈️ (@NewcastleJetsFC) October 16, 2017TweetFacebook Keeping up: Jack DuncanPictures: Jonathan Carroll, Max Mason-Hubers, Darren Pateman (AAP)“It was a good experience,” Duncan said of his unscripted debut.“It was my one game for the club during that time andI look back with good memories. Brisbane equalled the record for the most games undefeated in a row in Australian sport that day. It was a bit of a milestone. For myself it was the start of good things to come.”

Now back at the Jets with 35 games to his name and firmly established as the No.1, Duncan is looking forward to another crack at the Roar at Suncorp Stadium on Sunday.

“We have made a good start to the season,” Duncan said.“We are taking it one game at a time, but to start with four points out of six, the vibe around the place is good. Itis positive and the way we are playing is positive as well.”

Duncan, 24, produced an early contender for save of the year–a spectacular finger-tip effort to deny an Adam Taggart-header–in the second half of the 2-all draw with Perth last Sunday.

Though disappointed to concede two goals, including an injury-time equaliser, there was little he could do to stop the quality finishing from Taggart.

“They came fromdifferent areas in the six-yard box,” Duncan said.“The first one was a little glance, the second one a good header. They went across me and you can’t do too much about them. As a team we have looked at how we can prevent players like that getting into good areas and tryingto stop the service before it comes in.We have to work on our desperation in the backthird. If you look at thegoals we conceded, maybe we weren’t desperate enough to get to the ball and clear it. That little bit of intensity.”

Jets coach Ernie Merrick believes he is developing into an exceptional goalkeeper.

“Keepers don’t hit their peak until they are about 30,” Merrick said.

“He has a perfect build, is agile, is a good shotstopper and is competent in the air. The relationship he has with Glen Moss is almost unique. Glen is a 35-year-old who is still super fit and a national-team keeper. Glen has taken the attitude that ‘If I help Jack it will help the club and in turn help me’. I think that relationship has pushed Jack up to another level.”

Brisbane, led by former Serie-A striker Massimo Maccarone and recently arrived Frenchman AlecBautheac, pose a threat different to that of Glory.

“They have some good experienced player in Maccarone and FahidBen Khalfalla,” Duncan said.“We have looked at the strengths and weaknesses. We have analysed them but focused more on ourselves.”

Comments Off on Duncan ready to roar as Jets travel north

Hazlewood shapes as rock of Australian attack in Ashes

Written by admin on  Categories: 广州桑拿

There is a family friend of Josh Hazlewood who has followed the Australian team abroad over the past couple of years when he can, brandishing the same banner wherever he goes.
Nanjing Night Net

It reads “The Bendemeer Bullet”, in dual acknowledgement of the tiny village north-east of Tamworth from where the Test paceman hails and how quickly he rolls the arm over.

Matt Zell is his name. He was there in Dominica in 2015 and in Colombo last year, too. “He sort of saves up and goes on the away trips,” Hazlewood says. “He’s a cricket nuffie and loves touring.”

The fast bowler’s travel-happy mate hasn’t tagged along for every Test series that has featured Hazlewood. Had he done so he would very likely be out of pocket because the 26-year-old is the Australian pace attack’s everywhere man.

He approaches the Ashes next month having missed only two Tests in 33 since he made his debut against India at the Gabba in 2014. So constant and reliable a presence is he on the Australian scene that at the National Cricket Centre in Brisbane there is even a Hazlewood setting on the ProBatter bowling simulator. Batsmen in training there can watch him on a video screen trotting in on his run-up before a machine spits out a ball at them as he reaches the crease. If it’s true to form most would be directed around the top of off-stump.

For Hazlewood the number of Tests he has been able to string together is a point of personal pride. So it was a blow to have to miss one in Bangladesh last month after picking up a side strain during the first match of the series in Dhaka. That was his 22nd consecutive Test, dating back to the start of the 2015/16 home summer. The only other Test he has missed was a dead rubber against England at the Oval three months earlier due to shin soreness.

“That was the first time I had walked off in a Test match so it was disappointing. You never want to let your teammates down,” Hazlewood says of the injury that ruled him out of the second Test in Chittagong. “It didn’t hurt so much me walking off in a subcontinent Test, I guess. We had a couple of spinners and you don’t play as big a role. But there is not many Tests you win if you’re a bowler down, especially during the first innings. So it’s a little badge of honour if you get through that many games.”

As he sets about starting over he once again shapes as the rock of the Australian fast bowling line-up this summer. The guy that you bring back on when you want to get a bit of control back in your attack, to steer you back on course for a wicket. Brad Haddin, Australia’s wicketkeeper when Hazlewood was given his baggy green cap and now a member of Darren Lehmann’s national coaching staff, describes him as “the backbone of that attack”.

“You know exactly what you’re going to get,” Haddin says.

An important factor in establishing that dependability is that Hazlewood himself has grown to know and trust his body. As a fellow member of Australia’s fab four of fast men, James Pattinson, faces another stretch on the sidelines with a lower-back stress fracture Hazlewood hopes he has put his days of serious bone injuries behind him.

The early stages of his first-class career were marred by a series of setbacks including stress fractures. And as an emerging fast bowler he had restrictions based on his workload to decrease the risk of further breakdowns. Now, he believes the cautious approach taken by Cricket Australia was the right way to go.

“It’s a bit frustrating at the time. You feel like you’re missing a lot of cricket,” says Hazlewood, who will make his return from the side strain in the NSW Premier Cricket competition and wait until round two of the Sheffield Shield season before joining Test teammates such as Steve Smith, David Warner and Nathan Lyon in the state side.

“But looking back now in the long run you’ve got to do it I think. Anywhere from when you start at 18 to 23 I think, even when you’re feeling good, I think you’ve got to take those rests just because your skeletal system isn’t fully grown yet.

“You sort of notice that point when you get to 22, 23 … everyone is different … but you feel everything just sort of harden up. You have that resistance in your body. I feel like your legs harden up first, then through the middle. You notice if over time playing consistent cricket. Once you play six months in a row or something like that you find you’re more confident, I guess.”

Hazlewood’s partners in crime in the Australian pace attack, Mitchell Starc and Pat Cummins, have been through all that themselves.

It is that pair who loom as getting the bulk of the attention with speed and short stuff against England but having seen the key roles played by Ryan Harris and Peter Siddle alongside a fire-breathing Mitchell Johnson in the 2013/14 Ashes Hazlewood is keen to make a similar contribution.

“I watched Ryan and Pete pretty closely and talked to them about it since then. I’ve talked to Sidds a fair bit about how he goes about his work in Test cricket,” he says.

“You don’t get the headlines like Mitch did but we’ve got two guys in the team now that can bowl that fast. Patty has got a very good bouncer, especially on Australian soil.

“[My role is] just to complement that and have that nice balance … if things aren’t going great they sort of can rely on myself and Lyono [Nathan Lyon] to steady the ship and get things back on track.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Comments Off on Hazlewood shapes as rock of Australian attack in Ashes

The sweeping rule changes to keep kids playing cricket

Written by admin on  Categories: 广州桑拿

What began as a pilot program to test modified cricket rules will become a nationwide revolution this summer as almost 65 per cent of Australian associations adopt the junior format shaping the sport’s future.
Nanjing Night Net

In what ex-Australian captain Greg Chappell describes as a critical direction junior cricket needs to take, 160 of the country’s 247 associations have opted to introduce radical rule changes for children in a bid to increase participation and player retention.

The majority of youngsters will pursue their craft under modified rules this summer as part of a staged roll out of the junior format concept, playing on shorter pitches with smaller equipment and alongside fewer teammates.

Last season’s pilot program, trialled across 15 associations, produced significant increases in boundaries struck, runs scored and wickets taken, and perhaps most crucially a reduction in the number of wides and no balls bowled.

“There are an inordinate number of kids that want to play our game and a lot of them we’ve scared off over the years because we’ve made the game too difficult,” Chappell said.

“We haven’t made it enough fun, we haven’t developed their passion early by giving them a memorable experience.

“The different formats are about compressing the game, increasing the number of moments that they’re involved in the game, handling the ball, bowling the ball, hitting the ball because that’s how you learn.

“It’s not about developing a technique, it’s about developing a love, developing a passion and the desire to want to get out there and keep trying to get better at it.”

Chappell knows first-hand just how many youngsters walk away from the sport. His son Jon, a talented cricketer in his own right, gave up the sport in favour of baseball in the 1990s.

A Cricket Australia roadshow four years ago asked fans across the country to outline their major concerns surrounding the sport and overwhelmingly, retention of players reared its head as a major issue.

Dr Ian Renshaw, father of Test opener Matthew and a lecturer at the Queensland University of Technology in human movement and sports science, was enlisted and he began a comprehensive biomechanical testing exercise.

Two hundred children in each age group, including boys, girls, cricketers and non-cricketers were put through their paces and tested on how far they could hit, bowl and throw a ball.

Data collected helped form the basis of the junior format modifications which kick in at under-nine level where youngsters play on a pitch of 14m in length with up to eight children per team, and with a 30m boundary.

Those restrictions are slowly relaxed as juniors age before they move onto a full-length pitch at under-14s.

“For 150, 200 years, maybe 400 years, we’ve been playing cricket off one measurement which happens to be the old term for a length of measurement for a field,” Cricket NSW development manager Nail McDonald said.

“So 22 yards, 66 feet, one chain. It was determined by some pastor back in the 16th century.

“There were more runs scored, more action in the field [last summer]. Kids rotating [strike] quicker, games finished in two hours instead of three and a half hours.

“It seems to have been well received so far and this year will prove the point.

“We went really hard at filling the bucket and somewhere along the way, there’s people that drop off the journey.

“I know it happens in all sports and cricket’s no different. We’d like to think out of this that we haven’t got as many holes in the sieve moving forward.”

Australia is not alone in the take up of junior format cricket.

In June this year former Australian women’s captain Belinda Clark and CA manager in junior formats Harry Tinney crossed the Tasman and presented their case to the Kiwis.

New Zealand will roll out pilot programs of their own this summer, with a view to a 100 per cent take-up over the next few years.

Tinney hopes Australia will also hit 100 per cent participation in the coming years.

“That’s the aspiration, our hope is that it becomes junior cricket,” Tinney said.

“We’re allowing junior cricketers to progress through a staged model that allows them to perform the skills that they see on television and see when they watch elite cricketers. They can do that under a staged model as they progress towards what is the traditional adult game.

“It’s evidence based, tested, proven and combined with the community buy in and as a result we’ve had such a significant take-up.”

JUNIOR FORMATS

Stage 1

Age: Under 11 Pitch length: 16m Players per team: 7 Overs per team: 20 (max) Boundary: 40m Ball size: 125-142g

Stage 2

Age: Under 13 Pitch length: 18m Players per team: 9 Overs per team: 30 (max) Boundary: 45m Ball size: 142g

Stage 3

Age: Under 14-19 Pitch length: 20m Players per team: 11 Overs per team: 40 (max) Boundary: 50m Ball size: 156g (male) 142g (female)

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Comments Off on The sweeping rule changes to keep kids playing cricket

Comfortable family living in flawless Federation

Written by admin on  Categories: 广州桑拿

​The owners had always admired “Cartrefle” from afar.
Nanjing Night Net

Comfortable family living in flawless Federation CLASSIC: This circa 1919 Lambton home has a commanding presence on a large corner block and had always taken the eye of its owners.

House of the week: 79 Howe Street, Lambton

House of the week: 79 Howe Street, Lambton

House of the week: 79 Howe Street, Lambton

House of the week: 79 Howe Street, Lambton

House of the week: 79 Howe Street, Lambton

House of the week: 79 Howe Street, Lambton

House of the week: 79 Howe Street, Lambton

House of the week: 79 Howe Street, Lambton

House of the week: 79 Howe Street, Lambton

House of the week: 79 Howe Street, Lambton

House of the week: 79 Howe Street, Lambton

TweetFacebook House of the week: 79 Howe Street, LambtonBuilt circa 1919 this sympathetically renovated federation home has only ever had three owners and has a commanding presence in Lambton.The name is Welsh for home and that is what they always wanted it to be after purchasing the historic Lambton residence 14 years ago.

The stunning four-bedroom house is one of the most recognisable in the suburb.

Built in 1919 by William Knight for the wealthy Payne Family, the home has only ever had three owners.

“I’d always admired the old place and when we saw it was for sale, it was something that took our eye,” the owner said.

They bought it within days of looking through. The federation architecture and timeless beauty was what won them over.

“I just love old houses and it’s abeautiful home. There are not too many around from that era that are still intact,” he said.

“It was so original inside, it really hadn’t been altered.”

The owners have renovated and extended over the yearsadding a large family room, redoing the kitchen and adding a wrap-around verandah andnew garage.

Being “sympathetic to the architecture that was already there” was crucial.

“It’s modernised but still in the character ofthe house.”

Many original features remain, including brass name plates on both entries, fireplaces, timber joinery, pull chords, leadlight windows andplasterwork.

The extensive garden has been “a labour of love” for the owner, who has a landscaping business.

The home is set on a 981-square-metre corner block and is being marketed with a price guide of $1.55 million.

HOUSE OF THE WEEK

Address: 79 Howe Street, Lambton

Price guide: $1.55 million

Agency: Dalton Partners

Contact: Scott Purnell on 0438 770 427; Joanna Cook on 0407 826 391

Inspect: Contact agent

Comments Off on Comfortable family living in flawless Federation

Five times earthlings have been hit by falling meteorites

Written by admin on  Categories: 广州桑拿

STARGAZER’S DELIGHT: This week is a great time to look to the skies for meteor showers and fireballs. Picture: John Schumack.The cloudy conditions could obscurea stunning astronomical event in the early hours of the morning on Saturday –a meteor shower called the Orionids, which were expected to undergo its peak event on this weekend.
Nanjing Night Net

But even if the weather would not cooperate, Hunter stargazer David Reneke said the Orionids will still be visible over the next few days.

“The golden rule with these things is patience,” Mr Reneke said.

“It’llhappen when you least expect it.”

The night sky for the rest of this month is looking good with no harsh moonlight towash out our after dinner skies.

It’s a great target for the novice telescope owner aswell because it’s just so easy to find stars and star clusters.

“Generally, [the Orionids]is a good shower for beginners with estimates of around 30 meteorsper hour,”Dave Reneke from Australasian Science magazine said.

“As with allshowers, the best time for viewing will be from around midnight until an hour beforesunrise.”

The shower is centred around the constellation Orion.

“From any Aussie backyard justlook for the familiar shape of the ‘Saucepan’ and watch below the three stars thatmake up the bottom of the pan.

Now, just to spice things up a little, there’s a second lesser known shower happeningafterwards.

The Taurids are a long duration meteor shower visible throughout springand peaking during the first week of November.

They have been described as beingbright, slow moving and with the occasional colourful fireball.

So, what exactly are meteor showers?They are the tail ends of comets.

As comets orbit the Sun, they shed an icy, dusty debris stream along the comet’s orbit.

If earth travels through this stream, we see a meteor shower.

Meteor showers arenamed by the constellation from which meteors appear to fall.

“They’re called ‘shooting stars’ but that’s incorrect,” Mr Reneke said. “Stars don’t fall outof the sky, they’re simply small bits of iron rock.”

Has anyone ever been hit by ameteorite? You bet!

1954: An Alabama housewife was sleeping on her couch whena small meteor that crashed through the roof struck her on the hip.1992: Alarge meteor exploded over the eastern United States with pieces punchinga hole clear through the boot of a woman’s car. Her old and rather run down bombinstantly became a collector’s item and later sold for $200,000June, 1994: Jose Martin of Spain was driving with his wife near Madrid when a 1.4kilogram meteor crashed through his windshield, bent the steering wheel and endedup in the back seat. Martin suffered a broken finger while his wife was uninjured.1860: In Ohio, a horse reportedly died after being struck by a meteor.1911:A dogwas reportedly killed in Egypt.“Being clobbered by a meteor is still an extremely remote possibility,” Mr Reneke said.

Comments Off on Five times earthlings have been hit by falling meteorites