Gun amnesty nets arsenal of weapons

Gun amnesty nets arsenal of weapons Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police
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Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW Police

TweetFacebook Some of the weapons surrendered during the National Firearms Amnesty. Picture: NSW PoliceA 1918anti-tank rifle, eight M1 carbine military self-loading rifles, four sub-machine guns and a .44 calibre magnum revolver were among the weapons surrendered in NSW as part of the National Firearms Amnesty.

Nearly 10,000 firearms and firearm-related items, including 602 handguns and 1575 shotguns, were handed in to police and dealers in NSW during the three-month campaign.

Of the top 10 police commands to receive the most surrendered firearms, nine were outside of metropolitan Sydney.

Lake Macquarie was sixth on that list, with 266 firearms and firearm-related items handed in.

Police said 169 firearms were surrendered in Port Stephens and 154 in Central Hunter, which covers Cessnock, Maitland and the surrounding suburbs.

Police said among the firearms surrendered were20 SKS assault rifles, eight M1 carbine military self-loading rifles, four sub-machine guns, a Colt AR-15 rifle, a .44 calibre magnum revolver, an Adler 110 shotgun, and a Mauser model 1918 T-Gewehr-Bolt Action anti-tank rifle.

And as well as that arsenal of high-powered firearms, police also took hold of 130 prohibited weapons during the amnesty, including 14 crossbows, 27 suppressors, samurai swords, knives, and other weapons.

NSW Police Deputy Commissioner Regional Field Operations Gary Worboys said the response from the community was overwhelming, especially in regional areas.

“It’s extremely encouraging to see community members recognising the danger posed by these weapons and doing the right thing by handing them in or having them registered,” Deputy Commissioner Worboys said.

“There has been a really strong response across the state which means there are now fewer unwanted or unregistered guns on our streets.”

Jeff Loy, the Deputy Commissioner Metropolitan Field Operations, said gun crime affects everyone.

“In the wrong-hands, guns are a lethal weapon so it’s pleasing to see people are keen to do the right thing and have used the opportunity to dispose of firearms and other weapons to ensure they don’t end up in the wrong hands,” Deputy Commissioner Loy said.

“It’s concerning these high-powered weapons and modified guns were in our community but they have now been destroyed under amnesty arrangements.”

Homeless man refused bail over alleged post office stabbing

SCENE: Police block off Hunter Street Mall after an alleged stabbing on Thursday night. A HOMELESS man accused of stabbing another man atthe old Newcastle post office is yet to give any reason for his alleged actions, unable to explain why there was blood on a knife allegedly seized from his backpack.
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Joel Viviensby, 46, who gave an addressof Parry Street, Leichhardt, was refused bail in Newcastle Local Court on Friday, after being arrested the night before.

Mr Viviensby, who the court heard had paranoidschizophrenia,is charged with causing grievous bodily harm with intent, allegedly stabbing a 33-year-old man outside the former post office about 9pm on Thursday.

According to a police statement of facts, the victim screamed “I’ve been stabbed, I’ve been stabbed”, before later collapsing a short distance from the post office withabdominal injuries, and was rushed to John Hunter Hospital in a critical condition.

The victim, who told police he was at the post office to visit people he knew, was in a serious but stable condition on Friday, having undergone surgery for a single stab wound.

The police facts state Mr Viviensby was arrested at the Bolton Street alcove of the post office, with officers allegedly seizinga nine-centimetre flick knife from the homeless man’s bag.

Under police questioning, Mr Viviensby could allegedly offer no explanation as to why there was blood on the knife. Police were also unable to ascertain a motive for the alleged attack.

Police had the street blocked off for several hours on Thursday.

The court heard on Friday that the 46-year-old had not sought treatment for his schizophrenia for some time. The court also heard Mr Viviensby was homeless and roamed between Newcastle and Sydney.

During an application for release, Legal Aid solicitor Lauren Hartigan said Mr Viviensby could stay at a hostel in Wickham and report to Newcastle police station.

However, police prosecutor Steve Ling argued Mr Viviensby posed an unacceptable risk to the community.

Magistrate IanCheetham denied the application for release and ordered Mr Viviensby undergo a mental health assessment at Calvary Mater Hospital.

Mr Viviensby appeared unsettled as his matter was heard on Friday. “Your honour, I’m not guilty,” he shouted from the dock.

The matter was adjourned to January 11, with Mr Viviensby to appear via audiovisual link.

Victoria has just voted to remove its most basic human right: Paul Keating

Former Labor prime minister Paul Keating has reacted angrily to the passage of Victoria’s Voluntary Assisted Dying Bill through the state’s lower house, branding it “deeply regressive” and an abrogation of “the core instinct to survive”.
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Mr Keating, who weighed in to the contentious debate at the last minute on Thursday to warn MPs against the change, has issued a terse statement on the legislation.

“The passage of the Voluntary Assisted Dying Bill through the Victorian lower house is truly a sad moment for the whole country,” Mr Keating said.

“What is means is that the civic guidance provided by the state, in our second largest state, is voided when it comes to the protection of our most valuable asset; the essential human rights of the citizenry, especially and particularly those in either a fragile state or state of mind or fragile period.

“I am sure it is true that those who voted for the legislation did so with the best of intentions.

“But again, this vote underlines the compelling truth that, as often as not, good intentions are not enough.

“To do or to cause to abrogate the core human instinct to survive and live, for the spirit to hang on against physical deprivations, is to turn one’s back on the compulsion built into the hundreds of thousands of years of our evolution.

“One can only hope that the members of the Victorian upper house have the understanding and the confidence to beat this deeply regressive legislation.”

Mr Keating remains hopeful that the Legislative Assembly’s 47-37 approval of the controversial laws will be reversed when the historic bill reaches the Legislative Council next month.

But describing the bill as “safe, balanced and conservative,” Victoria’s Labor Premier Daniel Andrews warmly welcomed the successful navigation of its first parliamentary test.

“This is extraordinary. Public life is about getting the big and important things done,” he said, while praising his Health Minister, Jill Hennessy, for driving the process.

That endorsement came despite the ill-feeling caused when Ms Hennessy inadvertently sent a text message intended for someone else to her colleague and Deputy Premier James Merlino, in which she reportedly described him as a “c—“.

Mr Merlino campaigned strongly to defeat the bill, moving an amendment with that intended effect during the protracted parliamentary debate.

Retired Liberal senator Bill Heffernan praised Mr Keating for speaking out.

He said during the parliamentary inquiry into the Northern Territory’s Rights of the Terminally Ill law in the mid-1990s – which saw the Howard government intervene to override the Territory statute in 1997 – the committee took evidence in the Netherlands from a health professional who claimed that as many as 50 per cent of the people who’d been legally “euthanased” in the previous year had not given their consent.

“It was becoming, as our informant described it, a management tool for institutions,” the 74-year old said.

“There are unintended consequences which we’ll all regret, so I congratulate Paul Keating for taking a stand.”

As the vote approached, Mr Keating had criticised what he called the “bald utopianism” underpinning the idea that the state could codify protections for its most vulnerable people, while also making it legal to participate in a person’s death.

“The advocates support a bill to authorise termination of life in the name of compassion, while at the same time claiming they can guarantee protection of the vulnerable, the depressed and the poor,” he wrote.

“No law and no process can achieve that objective. This is the point. If there are doctors prepared to bend the rules now, there will be doctors prepared to bend the rules under the new system. Beyond that, once termination of life is authorised, the threshold is crossed.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

10,000 guns and related items handed in during amnesty

Nearly 10,000 guns and gun-related items – including 987 barrels handed in by one man – have been surrendered to police and dealers during the national firearms amnesty.
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Some 20 SKS assault rifles, eight M1 carbine military self-loading rifles, four sub-machine guns and an anti-tank rifle were also handed in during the three-month amnesty which ended on September 30.

Police said there were 602 handguns and 1575 shotguns surrendered to police and dealers while 14 crossbows, 27 suppressors, samurai swords, knives and other prohibited weapons were also handed in.

“It’s concerning these high-powered weapons and modified guns were in our community but they have now been destroyed under amnesty arrangements,” Deputy Commissioner Jeff Loy said.

Nine of the top 10 local area commands for weapons surrendered were in regional areas, including the Tamworth-based Oxley command which topped the list with 1322 items.

It included 987 barrels handed in by one owner.

The Northern Beaches, where 295 items were surrendered, was third on the list.

“It’s extremely encouraging to see community members recognising the danger posed by these weapons and doing the right thing by handing them in or having them registered,” Deputy Commissioner (Regional Field Operations) Gary Worboys said.

“There has been a really strong response across the state which means there are now fewer unwanted or unregistered guns on our streets.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Shameless fraudster Page living it up in $500,000 Ferrari

HIGH LIFE: Lemuel Page, pictured with his partner Renay Bull, has been driving around Newcastle in a 458 Ferrari Italia similar to this one. NEWCASTLE fraudster Lemuel Page continues to live the high life flaunting his taste for fine cars.
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If the holidays to the Greek Islands and luxury beachfrontunitweren’t infuriating enough for his creditors, they wereapoplectic at Page’slatest toy: a Ferrari 458 Italia Speciale V8worth up to $500,000.

Fairfax Media can reveal that the luxury caris owned by Ohmut, a company run by Page’s ex-wife Fiona Page, of Cardiff, keeping the expensive toyat arm’s length from creditors.

Adding salt to the wound is the fact that several creditors, who lost their life savings to Page, have seen him driving aroundin the luxury car in the past few weeks.

In a place like Newcastle a Ferraristands out. But Page, a notorious big talker, doesn’t seem to care.

A creditor, who asked not to be named, saidthemaster manipulator was “deliberately rubbing it in our faces”.

In July, Page’s lengthy career as one of Newcastle’s most notoriousscam merchants came to a very public end when he was convicted of fraud in the Downing Centre Local Court and sentenced to at least eight months in jail.

Page, a self-proclaimed “successful shares trader”, who regularly boasts of links to the notorious Sydney family the Ibrahims, appealed the sentence, was released on bail and is due to reappear before the Sydney District Court next month.

His fraud conviction for selling a friend a fake diamond ring for $85,000 was music to the ears of dozens of Hunter investors and tradespeople who trusted Page with their money and lost it.

Despite his cries of crippling financial stress,Page, 48, is stillspotted driving around the Hunter in a luxury Mercedes 4WD and now the Ferrari.

The Ferrari was purchased in 2015 and financed to BMW Australia Finance.

Fairfax Media understands the car had been in storage at a Sydney car dealer for almost a year.

CLOSE: Lemuel Page and his ex-wife, Fiona Page, of Cardiff. The Ferrari is owned by a company run by Fiona Page.

According to a trustee report compiled byGeoffrey McDonald in August2015, Page claimed he had no real estate interests, onecar that heowed money on and a string of failed investments.

At that point he only had $200 cash to his name, the report detailed.In June, insolvency expertswere called in to take control of Page’s former companies, Elefteria and Elefteria Properties,one that used to hold property worth millions across Newcastle and Sydney.

But the chances of creditors getting anythingback from the failed companies is remote after the extensive property assets of Elefteria Properties weresold off in the months before the companyfailed.

All properties were sold to companies linked to Page’s long-term partnerRenayBull or his ex-wifeFiona Page who he remains close to.